september 2017

How To Get Your Baby In The Right Position For Birth

So you've just visited your midwife and she (or he) has told you that your baby is back to back. What do you do now?

10 min read Karen McEwen pregnancy Recommended Products
How To Get Your Baby In The Right Position For Birth
share

jump to section

My Baby's Back to Back, What Can I Do?

So you've just visited your midwife and she (or he) has told you that your baby is back to back. What do you do now? Well, you can try hands and knees position and avoid slouching during pregnancy, although current evidence would suggest that this makes little difference to the position that your baby will be in as your labour begins. Current evidence would also dispute the notion that the cause of your baby's back to back position is related to what you have and have not done (see above).

Some 15 - 30% of babies will start labour in this position and to them this is a comfortable, normal position. The reason that babies prefer this position is most usually due to the shape and type of pelvis you have. So, let me explain exactly what back to back means and why it happens

What Is It?

The technical name for this is 'Occipito Posterior' and you may see it in your maternity notes as simply 'OP'. Your baby is sitting upside down, or head down, in your womb and looking towards your your stomach muscles (if you had a sunroof where your belly button was you'd be able to see his beautiful face). During pregnancy, this position makes no difference to you or him, he's quite happy there and may well decide that he'd like to stay there. The difference with this position as opposed to when babies face your spine is the impact that it has on your labour. Let us explain why and how that happens:

Why Does It Happen?

Your pelvis is made up of 3 bones which are held together with ligaments, muscles and tendons. At the back is the sacrum, and this, along with the bottom part of your spine protrudes on the internal part of your pelvis. This prominent part of your pelvis combined with your posture may cause a baby in the back to back or 'posterior' position to tip his head back slightly. "Why would this be a problem?" I hear you ask, well, imagine that you